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Haskell Quiz/Bytecode Compiler/Solution Justin Bailey

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This solution isn't the cleanest or quite tested, but if you load it in hugs and run:
 
This solution isn't the cleanest or quite tested, but if you load it in hugs and run:
   
  +
<haskell>
 
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt1
 
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt1
 
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt2
 
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt2
 
...
 
...
 
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt8
 
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt8
  +
</haskell>
   
 
You'll see the byte codes generated. I didn't implement any optimizations (i.e. using SWAP).
 
You'll see the byte codes generated. I didn't implement any optimizations (i.e. using SWAP).

Revision as of 00:15, 4 November 2006

This solution isn't the cleanest or quite tested, but if you load it in hugs and run:

compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt1
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt2
...
compile $ parse $ tokenize $ stmt8

You'll see the byte codes generated. I didn't implement any optimizations (i.e. using SWAP).

The code below is literate Haskell.

\begin{code}
import Data.Char(isAlpha, isDigit, isSeparator)
 
data Op = Plus | Minus | Mult | Div | Pow | Mod
  deriving (Show, Eq)
 
data Token = RightParen 
           | LeftParen
           | Number Integer
           | Operator Op
  deriving (Show, Eq)
 
data Expression = Statement Op Expression Expression
           | Val Integer
           | Empty
  deriving (Show)
 
data Bytecode = NOOP | CONST Integer | LCONST Integer
            | ADD
            | SUB
            | MUL
            | POW
            | DIV
            | MOD
            | SWAP
  deriving (Show)
 
expr1 = Statement Plus (Val 1) (Val 2)
expr2 = Statement Mult (Statement Plus (Val 1) (Val 2))  (Val 3)
 
-- Take a statement and evaluate 
eval (Val n) = n
eval (Statement op left right)
        | op == Mult = eval left * eval right
        | op == Minus = eval left - eval right
        | op == Plus = eval left + eval right
        | op == Div = eval left `div` eval right
        | op == Pow = eval left ^ eval right
        | op == Mod = eval left `mod` eval right
 
-- Take a string and tokenize it
tokenize [] = []
tokenize ('(':xs) = LeftParen : tokenize xs
tokenize (')':xs) = RightParen : tokenize xs
tokenize (x:xs) | isDigit x = let (val, remaining) = span isDigit (x:xs)
                              in Number (read val) : tokenize remaining
                | isOperator x = toOperator x : tokenize xs
                | isSeparator x = tokenize (dropWhile isSeparator xs)
                where
                  makeOp '+' = Just $ Operator Plus
                  makeOp '-' = Just $ Operator Minus
                  makeOp '*' = Just $ Operator Mult
                  makeOp '/' = Just $ Operator Div
                  makeOp '^' = Just $ Operator Pow
                  makeOp '%' = Just $ Operator Mod
                  makeOp _ = Nothing
                  toOperator x = case makeOp x of
                                      Just x -> x
                                      _ -> error "Bad operator."
                  isOperator x = case makeOp x of
                                      Just x -> True
                                      _ -> False
 
stmt1 = "1 + 2" -- 3
stmt2 = "1 + 2 * 3" -- 7
stmt3 = "(1 + 2) * 3" -- 9
stmt4 = "4 - 5 * 2" -- -6
stmt5 = "5 * (2 - 4)" -- -10
stmt6 = "(1*3)*4*(5*6)" -- 360
stmt7 = "2^(2+(3/2)^2)" -- 8
stmt8 = "(10%3)*(2+2)" -- 4
 
{-
 Based on http://www.engr.mun.ca/~theo/Misc/exp_parsing.htm
 
 E -> E + E
 E -> E * E
 E -> E / E
 E -> E - E
 E -> E % E
 E -> E ^ E
 E -> ( E )
 E -> n
 
 Transform to
 
  E --> Exp(0) 
  Exp(p) --> P {B Exp(q)} 
  P --> "(" E ")" | v
  B --> "+" | "-"  | "*" |"/" | "^" | "%"
 
 Precedence
 
  ^       3
  *, /, % 2
  +, -    1 
 
-}
 
-- define precdence of operators
precedence Plus = 1
precedence Minus = 1
precedence Mult = 2
precedence Div = 3
precedence Mod = 2
precedence Pow = 3
 
-- Precedence comparison - gets precedence of 
-- given operator and determines if its greater than the value given.
(>*) op val = precedence op >= val  
 
-- Precedence addition - for left associative operators,
-- return its precedence + 1. For righ associative, just return the operators
-- precedence.
prec_add p@(Pow) = precedence p
prec_add p = 1 + precedence p
 
parse [] = error "Can't parse empty list of tokens"
parse tokens = fst $ parseE tokens 0
  where parseE tokens prec
          = let (p, remaining) = parseP tokens prec
            in
              if remaining == []
              then (p, remaining)
              else case head remaining of
                Operator op ->
                  if op >* prec
                  then
                    let (right, rest) = parseE (tail remaining) $ prec_add op
                    in (Statement op p right, rest)
                  else let (left, rest) = parseE (tail remaining) $ prec
                    in (Statement op left p, rest)
                _ -> (p, remaining)
        parseP ((Number n):ts) prec = (Val n, ts)
        parseP ((LeftParen):ts) prec
          = let (e, remaining) = parseE ts 0
            in (e, tail remaining)
 
compile stmt = compile' stmt []
 
compile' (Statement op left right) instr =
  let li = compile' left instr
      ri = compile' right instr
      lri = li ++ ri
  in case op of
    Plus -> lri ++ [ADD]
    Minus -> lri ++ [SUB]
    Mult -> lri ++ [MUL]
    Div -> lri ++ [DIV]
    Mod -> lri ++ [MOD]
    Pow -> lri ++ [POW]
compile' (Val n) instr = instr ++ [LCONST n]
 
\end{code}