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Meta-tutorial

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# You have programmed in other functional languages before
 
# You have programmed in other functional languages before
 
#* A Gentle Introduction?
 
#* A Gentle Introduction?
  +
#* [http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Write_Yourself_a_Scheme_in_48_Hours Write Yourself a Scheme in 48 Hours]
 
# You just want to see what Haskell looks like at a glance
 
# You just want to see what Haskell looks like at a glance
 
#* [[Simple unix tools]]
 
#* [[Simple unix tools]]

Revision as of 14:47, 27 December 2006

what i would like is a meta-tutorial
a list of questions about haskell, what does this do, do you understand this etc
and if you say no, it points you at a tutorial which explains it -- ndm on #haskell

One size does not fit all! The meta-tutorial aims to help you find the Haskell tutorials that you need. Note that from our description of things, some tutorials might seem "too easy" for your level, but they might be worth checking out anyway, for example, because they are particularly clear or well written.

Contents

1 Haskell in general

1.1 You are new to programming

1.2 You have experience programming

  1. You are new to functional programming
  2. You have programmed in other functional languages before
  3. You just want to see what Haskell looks like at a glance


2 Monads

  1. You are new to Haskell
  2. You don't mind Haskell syntax, but you don't neccesarily feel comfortable working with monads (for example, with do notation)
  3. You learn best by doing exercises
  4. You learn by metaphor or analogy
  5. You understand category theory and you want to know what's the link between category theory monads and Haskell monads

3 Practical stuff

  1. You want to write a real life application or library
  2. You want to build a graphical user interface