Personal tools

New monads

From HaskellWiki

Revision as of 23:10, 7 September 2010 by Steshaw (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents


Remember to add a [ [ Category:Code ] ] tag to any new sub-pages.

1 MonadBase

It seems that the liftIO function from MonadIO can be generalized to access whatever the base of a transformer stack happens to be. So there is no need for a liftSTM, liftST, etc.

View New monads/MonadBase.

2 MonadLib

MonadLib is written by Iavor S. Diatchki.

It is a new version of the mtl package with base monads: Id, and Lift, and transformers ReaderT, WriterT, StateT, ExceptionT, ChoiceT, and ContT.

It also defines BaseM which is like MonadBase above.

3 MonadRandom

A simple monad transformer to allow computations in the transformed monad to generate random values.

View New monads/MonadRandom.

3.1 MonadRandomSplittable

A refinement of MonadRandom to integrate RandomGen's split function.

View at New monads/MonadRandomSplittable

4 MaybeT

The Maybe monad deserves a transformer, just like the other classic monads.

View New monads/MaybeT.

5 MonadSupply

Here is a simple monad/monad transformer for computations which consume values from a (finite or infinite) supply. Note that due to pattern matching, running out of supply in a non-MonadZero monad will cause an error.

View New monads/MonadSupply.

6 MonadUndo

Here is a modified state monad transformer for keeping track of undo/redo states automatically.

View New monads/MonadUndo.

7 MonadUnique

This is a simple (trivial) monad transformer for supplying unique integer values to an algorithm.

View New monads/MonadUnique.

8 MonadSTO

Here's an extension of the ST monad in which the references are ordered and showable (they list their creation index).

View New monads/MonadSTO.

9 MonadNondet

There is a MonadNondet that when compiled with optimizations outperforms List.

10 Stateful nondeterminism

There is a Stateful nondeterminism monad for if you want to do nondeterministic computation with local states for each of your threads and a global state shared by all your threads.

11 MonadAdvSTM

Here is an extension of STM to easy interaction with IO after committing or retrying. Inspired by Simon P-J.

View New monads/MonadAdvSTM.

12 TimedStateT

A monad transformer which combines State, Reader, and Error functionality to give the effect of a StateT monad which checks clock-time and stops the current computation if a period is exceeded.

darcs get http://www.mapcar.org/haskell/TimedStateT/

Haddocks: http://www.mapcar.org/haskell/TimedStateT/dist/doc/html/

13 MonadExit

The Exit monad provides short-circuiting for complex program flow logic.

If you are using CPS or MonadCont only for this purpose, the Exit monad will likely simplify your program considerably.

View MonadExit.

14 MonadSplit

Represents the class of monads such that

l == (msplit l >>= \(x,xs) -> return x `mplus` xs)

In English, msplit is a counterpart to "mplus".

Using this, you can redefine many of the functions which previously depended on lists: foldM, scanM, inits, tails, and some derived functions.

Note: A more general form of this monad, Data.Foldable, is now part of the standard libraries.

View New monads/MonadSplit.

15 Lazy and Strict variants

This section contains monads that have interesting Strict or Lazy properties.

15.1 LazyWriterT

This came up on the mailing list: Why is WriterT never lazy? The answer is it does not use lazy patterns with "~". So here is a more useful New monads/LazyWriterT that add two "~" to the definition of (>>=) and renames WriterT to LazyWriterT.

15.2 Strict RWS

This was contribute by John Meacham on on the haskell-cafe mailing list. New monads/UnboxedRWS is an strict variant of RWS.