/

(/) :: Fractional a => a -> a -> a
base Prelude
(/=) :: Eq a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Eq
(//) :: (IArray a e, Ix i) => a i e -> [(i, e)] -> a i e
array Data.Array.IArray
Takes an array and a list of pairs and returns an array identical to the left argument except that it has been updated by the associations in the right argument. For example, if m is a 1-origin, n by n matrix, then m//[((i,i), 0) | i <- [1..n]] is the same matrix, except with the diagonal zeroed. As with the array function, if any two associations in the list have the same index, the value at that index is implementation-dependent. (In GHC, the last value specified for that index is used. Other implementations will also do this for unboxed arrays, but Haskell 98 requires that for Array the value at such indices is bottom.) For most array types, this operation is O(n) the size of the array. However, the diffarray package provides an array type for which this operation has complexity linear in the number of updates.
(//) :: Ix i => Array i e -> [(i, e)] -> Array i e
array Data.Array
Constructs an array identical to the first argument except that it has been updated by the associations in the right argument. For example, if m is a 1-origin, n by n matrix, then > m//[((i,i), 0) | i <- [1..n]] is the same matrix, except with the diagonal zeroed. Repeated indices in the association list are handled as for array: Haskell 98 specifies that the resulting array is undefined (i.e. bottom), but GHC's implementation uses the last association for each index.
(</>) :: FilePath -> FilePath -> FilePath
filepath System.FilePath.Windows, filepath System.FilePath.Posix
A nice alias for combine.