Eq a => a -> [a] -> [Int]

elemIndices :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [Int]
base Data.List
The elemIndices function extends elemIndex, by returning the indices of all elements equal to the query element, in ascending order.
delete :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
delete x removes the first occurrence of x from its list argument. For example, > delete 'a' "banana" == "bnana" It is a special case of deleteBy, which allows the programmer to supply their own equality test.
intersperse :: a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersperse function takes an element and a list and `intersperses' that element between the elements of the list. For example, > intersperse ',' "abcde" == "a,b,c,d,e"
elemIndicesL :: Eq a => a -> Seq a -> [Int]
containers Data.Sequence
elemIndicesL finds the indices of the specified element, from left to right (i.e. in ascending order).
elemIndicesR :: Eq a => a -> Seq a -> [Int]
containers Data.Sequence
elemIndicesR finds the indices of the specified element, from right to left (i.e. in descending order).
insertBy :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The non-overloaded version of insert.
deleteBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The deleteBy function behaves like delete, but takes a user-supplied equality predicate.
replace :: Eq a => a -> a -> [a] -> [a]
cgi Network.CGI.Protocol
Replaces all instances of a value in a list by another value.
(\\) :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The \\ function is list difference ((non-associative). In the result of xs \\ ys, the first occurrence of each element of ys in turn (if any) has been removed from xs. Thus > (xs ++ ys) \\ xs == ys. It is a special case of deleteFirstsBy, which allows the programmer to supply their own equality test.
intersect :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersect function takes the list intersection of two lists. For example, > [1,2,3,4] `intersect` [2,4,6,8] == [2,4] If the first list contains duplicates, so will the result. > [1,2,2,3,4] `intersect` [6,4,4,2] == [2,2,4] It is a special case of intersectBy, which allows the programmer to supply their own equality test.
union :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The union function returns the list union of the two lists. For example, > "dog" `union` "cow" == "dogcw" Duplicates, and elements of the first list, are removed from the the second list, but if the first list contains duplicates, so will the result. It is a special case of unionBy, which allows the programmer to supply their own equality test.
(++) :: [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
Append two lists, i.e., > [x1, ..., xm] ++ [y1, ..., yn] == [x1, ..., xm, y1, ..., yn] > [x1, ..., xm] ++ [y1, ...] == [x1, ..., xm, y1, ...] If the first list is not finite, the result is the first list.
drop :: Int -> [a] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
drop n xs returns the suffix of xs after the first n elements, or [] if n > length xs: > drop 6 "Hello World!" == "World!" > drop 3 [1,2,3,4,5] == [4,5] > drop 3 [1,2] == [] > drop 3 [] == [] > drop (-1) [1,2] == [1,2] > drop 0 [1,2] == [1,2] It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericDrop, in which n may be of any integral type.
take :: Int -> [a] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
take n, applied to a list xs, returns the prefix of xs of length n, or xs itself if n > length xs: > take 5 "Hello World!" == "Hello" > take 3 [1,2,3,4,5] == [1,2,3] > take 3 [1,2] == [1,2] > take 3 [] == [] > take (-1) [1,2] == [] > take 0 [1,2] == [] It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericTake, in which n may be of any integral type.
findSubstrings :: ByteString -> ByteString -> [Int]
bytestring Data.ByteString
Deprecated: findSubstrings is deprecated in favour of breakSubstring.
findSubstrings :: ByteString -> ByteString -> [Int]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
Find the indexes of all (possibly overlapping) occurances of a substring in a string.
deleteFirstsBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The deleteFirstsBy function takes a predicate and two lists and returns the first list with the first occurrence of each element of the second list removed.
intersectBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersectBy function is the non-overloaded version of intersect.
unionBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The unionBy function is the non-overloaded version of union.
scanl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
scanl is similar to foldl, but returns a list of successive reduced values from the left: > scanl f z [x1, x2, ...] == [z, z `f` x1, (z `f` x1) `f` x2, ...] Note that > last (scanl f z xs) == foldl f z xs.

Show more results