Int -> [a] -> a +base

(!!) :: [a] -> Int -> a
base Prelude, base Data.List
List index (subscript) operator, starting from 0. It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericIndex, which takes an index of any integral type.
drop :: Int -> [a] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
drop n xs returns the suffix of xs after the first n elements, or [] if n > length xs: > drop 6 "Hello World!" == "World!" > drop 3 [1,2,3,4,5] == [4,5] > drop 3 [1,2] == [] > drop 3 [] == [] > drop (-1) [1,2] == [1,2] > drop 0 [1,2] == [1,2] It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericDrop, in which n may be of any integral type.
take :: Int -> [a] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
take n, applied to a list xs, returns the prefix of xs of length n, or xs itself if n > length xs: > take 5 "Hello World!" == "Hello" > take 3 [1,2,3,4,5] == [1,2,3] > take 3 [1,2] == [1,2] > take 3 [] == [] > take (-1) [1,2] == [] > take 0 [1,2] == [] It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericTake, in which n may be of any integral type.
intersperse :: a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersperse function takes an element and a list and `intersperses' that element between the elements of the list. For example, > intersperse ',' "abcde" == "a,b,c,d,e"
genericIndex :: Integral a => [b] -> a -> b
base Data.List
The genericIndex function is an overloaded version of !!, which accepts any Integral value as the index.
asTypeOf :: a -> a -> a
base Prelude
asTypeOf is a type-restricted version of const. It is usually used as an infix operator, and its typing forces its first argument (which is usually overloaded) to have the same type as the second.
scaleFloat :: RealFloat a => Int -> a -> a
base Prelude
replicate :: Int -> a -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
replicate n x is a list of length n with x the value of every element. It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericReplicate, in which n may be of any integral type.
seq :: a -> b -> b
base Prelude
Evaluates its first argument to head normal form, and then returns its second argument as the result.
par :: a -> b -> b
base GHC.Conc.Sync, base GHC.Conc
pseq :: a -> b -> b
base GHC.Conc.Sync, base GHC.Conc
const :: a -> b -> a
base Prelude, base Data.Function
Constant function.
clearBit :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
complementBit :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
rotate :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
rotateL :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
rotateR :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
setBit :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
shift :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
shiftL :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
shiftR :: Bits a => a -> Int -> a
base Data.Bits
insertBy :: (a -> a -> Ordering) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The non-overloaded version of insert.
deleteBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The deleteBy function behaves like delete, but takes a user-supplied equality predicate.
trace :: String -> a -> a
base Debug.Trace
When called, trace outputs the string in its first argument, before returning the second argument as its result. The trace function is not referentially transparent, and should only be used for debugging, or for monitoring execution. Some implementations of trace may decorate the string that's output to indicate that you're tracing. The function is implemented on top of putTraceMsg.
foldl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> a
base Prelude, base Data.List
foldl, applied to a binary operator, a starting value (typically the left-identity of the operator), and a list, reduces the list using the binary operator, from left to right: > foldl f z [x1, x2, ..., xn] == (...((z `f` x1) `f` x2) `f`...) `f` xn The list must be finite.
foldl' :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> a
base Data.List
A strict version of foldl.
foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
base Prelude, base Data.List
foldr, applied to a binary operator, a starting value (typically the right-identity of the operator), and a list, reduces the list using the binary operator, from right to left: > foldr f z [x1, x2, ..., xn] == x1 `f` (x2 `f` ... (xn `f` z)...)
genericDrop :: Integral i => i -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The genericDrop function is an overloaded version of drop, which accepts any Integral value as the number of elements to drop.
genericTake :: Integral i => i -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The genericTake function is an overloaded version of take, which accepts any Integral value as the number of elements to take.
(++) :: [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
Append two lists, i.e., > [x1, ..., xm] ++ [y1, ..., yn] == [x1, ..., xm, y1, ..., yn] > [x1, ..., xm] ++ [y1, ...] == [x1, ..., xm, y1, ...] If the first list is not finite, the result is the first list.
(.&.) :: Bits a => a -> a -> a
base Data.Bits
(.|.) :: Bits a => a -> a -> a
base Data.Bits
xor :: Bits a => a -> a -> a
base Data.Bits
(:+) :: a -> a -> Complex a
base Data.Complex
forms a complex number from its real and imaginary rectangular components.
traceShow :: Show a => a -> b -> b
base Debug.Trace
Like trace, but uses show on the argument to convert it to a String. > traceShow = trace . show
appEndo :: Endo a -> a -> a
base Data.Monoid
fromMaybe :: a -> Maybe a -> a
base Data.Maybe
The fromMaybe function takes a default value and and Maybe value. If the Maybe is Nothing, it returns the default values; otherwise, it returns the value contained in the Maybe.
testBit :: Bits a => a -> Int -> Bool
base Data.Bits
deleteFirstsBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The deleteFirstsBy function takes a predicate and two lists and returns the first list with the first occurrence of each element of the second list removed.
intersectBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersectBy function is the non-overloaded version of intersect.

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