Map -opengl

module Data.Map
containers Data.Map
Note: You should use Data.Map.Strict instead of this module if: * You will eventually need all the values stored. * The stored values don't represent large virtual data structures to be lazily computed. An efficient implementation of ordered maps from keys to values (dictionaries). These modules are intended to be imported qualified, to avoid name clashes with Prelude functions, e.g. > import qualified Data.Map as Map The implementation of Map is based on size balanced binary trees (or trees of bounded balance) as described by: * Stephen Adams, "Efficient sets: a balancing act", Journal of Functional Programming 3(4):553-562, October 1993, http://www.swiss.ai.mit.edu/~adams/BB/. * J. Nievergelt and E.M. Reingold, "Binary search trees of bounded balance", SIAM journal of computing 2(1), March 1973. Note that the implementation is left-biased -- the elements of a first argument are always preferred to the second, for example in union or insert. Operation comments contain the operation time complexity in the Big-O notation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation).
data Map k a
containers Data.Map.Lazy, containers Data.Map.Strict
A Map from keys k to values a.
MapCRtoLF :: TerminalMode
unix System.Posix.Terminal, unix System.Posix.Terminal.ByteString
MapLFtoCR :: TerminalMode
unix System.Posix.Terminal, unix System.Posix.Terminal.ByteString
map :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b]
base Prelude, base Data.List
map f xs is the list obtained by applying f to each element of xs, i.e., > map f [x1, x2, ..., xn] == [f x1, f x2, ..., f xn] > map f [x1, x2, ...] == [f x1, f x2, ...]
map :: (Char -> Char) -> ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) map f xs is the ByteString obtained by applying f to each element of xs
map :: (Char -> Char) -> Text -> Text
text Data.Text, text Data.Text.Lazy
O(n) map f t is the Text obtained by applying f to each element of t. Subject to fusion. Performs replacement on invalid scalar values.
map :: (Key -> Key) -> IntSet -> IntSet
containers Data.IntSet
O(n*min(n,W)). map f s is the set obtained by applying f to each element of s. It's worth noting that the size of the result may be smaller if, for some (x,y), x /= y && f x == f y
map :: (Word8 -> Word8) -> ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy
O(n) map f xs is the ByteString obtained by applying f to each element of xs.
map :: (Word8 -> Word8) -> ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString
O(n) map f xs is the ByteString obtained by applying f to each element of xs. This function is subject to array fusion.
map :: (a -> b) -> IntMap a -> IntMap b
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n). Map a function over all values in the map. > map (++ "x") (fromList [(5,"a"), (3,"b")]) == fromList [(3, "bx"), (5, "ax")]
map :: (a -> b) -> Map k a -> Map k b
containers Data.Map.Lazy, containers Data.Map.Strict
O(n). Map a function over all values in the map. > map (++ "x") (fromList [(5,"a"), (3,"b")]) == fromList [(3, "bx"), (5, "ax")]
map :: Ord b => (a -> b) -> Set a -> Set b
containers Data.Set
O(n*log n). map f s is the set obtained by applying f to each element of s. It's worth noting that the size of the result may be smaller if, for some (x,y), x /= y && f x == f y
mapM :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m [b]
base Prelude, base Control.Monad
mapM f is equivalent to sequence . map f.
mapM_ :: Monad m => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m ()
base Prelude, base Control.Monad
mapM_ f is equivalent to sequence_ . map f.
mapAccumL :: (acc -> x -> (acc, y)) -> acc -> [x] -> (acc, [y])
base Data.List
The mapAccumL function behaves like a combination of map and foldl; it applies a function to each element of a list, passing an accumulating parameter from left to right, and returning a final value of this accumulator together with the new list.
mapAccumL :: Traversable t => (a -> b -> (a, c)) -> a -> t b -> (a, t c)
base Data.Traversable
The mapAccumL function behaves like a combination of fmap and foldl; it applies a function to each element of a structure, passing an accumulating parameter from left to right, and returning a final value of this accumulator together with the new structure.
mapAccumR :: (acc -> x -> (acc, y)) -> acc -> [x] -> (acc, [y])
base Data.List
The mapAccumR function behaves like a combination of map and foldr; it applies a function to each element of a list, passing an accumulating parameter from right to left, and returning a final value of this accumulator together with the new list.
mapAccumR :: Traversable t => (a -> b -> (a, c)) -> a -> t b -> (a, t c)
base Data.Traversable
The mapAccumR function behaves like a combination of fmap and foldr; it applies a function to each element of a structure, passing an accumulating parameter from right to left, and returning a final value of this accumulator together with the new structure.
mapAndUnzipM :: Monad m => (a -> m (b, c)) -> [a] -> m ([b], [c])
base Control.Monad
The mapAndUnzipM function maps its first argument over a list, returning the result as a pair of lists. This function is mainly used with complicated data structures or a state-transforming monad.

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