Ord a => [a] -> [a] +bytestring

transpose :: [ByteString] -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
The transpose function transposes the rows and columns of its ByteString argument.
concat :: [ByteString] -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Concatenate a list of ByteStrings.
fromChunks :: [ByteString] -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(c) Convert a list of strict ByteString into a lazy ByteString
unlines :: [ByteString] -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
unlines is an inverse operation to lines. It joins lines, after appending a terminating newline to each.
unwords :: [ByteString] -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
The unwords function is analogous to the unlines function, on words.
group :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
The group function takes a ByteString and returns a list of ByteStrings such that the concatenation of the result is equal to the argument. Moreover, each sublist in the result contains only equal elements. For example, > group "Mississippi" = ["M","i","ss","i","ss","i","pp","i"] It is a special case of groupBy, which allows the programmer to supply their own equality test.
group :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
The group function takes a ByteString and returns a list of ByteStrings such that the concatenation of the result is equal to the argument. Moreover, each sublist in the result contains only equal elements. For example, > group "Mississippi" = ["M","i","ss","i","ss","i","pp","i"] It is a special case of groupBy, which allows the programmer to supply their own equality test. It is about 40% faster than groupBy (==)
inits :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Return all initial segments of the given ByteString, shortest first.
lines :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
lines breaks a ByteString up into a list of ByteStrings at newline Chars. The resulting strings do not contain newlines.
lines :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
lines breaks a ByteString up into a list of ByteStrings at newline Chars. The resulting strings do not contain newlines. As of bytestring 0.9.0.3, this function is stricter than its list cousin.
tails :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Return all final segments of the given ByteString, longest first.
toChunks :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(c) Convert a lazy ByteString into a list of strict ByteString
words :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
words breaks a ByteString up into a list of words, which were delimited by Chars representing white space.
words :: ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
words breaks a ByteString up into a list of words, which were delimited by Chars representing white space. And > tokens isSpace = words
primMapListFixed :: FixedPrim a -> ([a] -> Builder)
bytestring Data.ByteString.Builder.Prim
Encode a list of values from left-to-right with a FixedPrim.
primMapListBounded :: BoundedPrim a -> [a] -> Builder
bytestring Data.ByteString.Builder.Prim
Create a Builder that encodes a list of values consecutively using a BoundedPrim for each element. This function is more efficient than the canonical > filter p = > B.toLazyByteString . > E.encodeLazyByteStringWithF (E.ifF p E.word8) E.emptyF) > mconcat . map (primBounded w) or > foldMap (primBounded w) because it moves several variables out of the inner loop.
intercalate :: ByteString -> [ByteString] -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) The intercalate function takes a ByteString and a list of ByteStrings and concatenates the list after interspersing the first argument between each element of the list.
groupBy :: (Word8 -> Word8 -> Bool) -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy
The groupBy function is the non-overloaded version of group.
splitWith :: (Word8 -> Bool) -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy
O(n) Splits a ByteString into components delimited by separators, The resulting components do not contain the separators. Two adjacent separators result in an empty component in the output. eg. > splitWith (=='a') "aabbaca" == ["","","bb","c",""] > splitWith (=='a') [] == []
groupBy :: (Char -> Char -> Bool) -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
The groupBy function is the non-overloaded version of group.
splitWith :: (Char -> Bool) -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Splits a ByteString into components delimited by separators, The resulting components do not contain the separators. Two adjacent separators result in an empty component in the output. eg. > splitWith (=='a') "aabbaca" == ["","","bb","c",""]
split :: Word8 -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy
O(n) Break a ByteString into pieces separated by the byte argument, consuming the delimiter. I.e. > split '\n' "a\nb\nd\ne" == ["a","b","d","e"] > split 'a' "aXaXaXa" == ["","X","X","X",""] > split 'x' "x" == ["",""] and > intercalate [c] . split c == id > split == splitWith . (==) As for all splitting functions in this library, this function does not copy the substrings, it just constructs new ByteStrings that are slices of the original.
split :: Char -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
O(n) Break a ByteString into pieces separated by the byte argument, consuming the delimiter. I.e. > split '\n' "a\nb\nd\ne" == ["a","b","d","e"] > split 'a' "aXaXaXa" == ["","X","X","X",""] > split 'x' "x" == ["",""] and > intercalate [c] . split c == id > split == splitWith . (==) As for all splitting functions in this library, this function does not copy the substrings, it just constructs new ByteStrings that are slices of the original.
split :: Char -> ByteString -> [ByteString]
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Break a ByteString into pieces separated by the byte argument, consuming the delimiter. I.e. > split '\n' "a\nb\nd\ne" == ["a","b","d","e"] > split 'a' "aXaXaXa" == ["","X","X","X"] > split 'x' "x" == ["",""] and > intercalate [c] . split c == id > split == splitWith . (==) As for all splitting functions in this library, this function does not copy the substrings, it just constructs new ByteStrings that are slices of the original.
copy :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Make a copy of the ByteString with its own storage. This is mainly useful to allow the rest of the data pointed to by the ByteString to be garbage collected, for example if a large string has been read in, and only a small part of it is needed in the rest of the program.
cycle :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
cycle ties a finite ByteString into a circular one, or equivalently, the infinite repetition of the original ByteString.
fromStrict :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(1) Convert a strict ByteString into a lazy ByteString.
init :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
O(1) Return all the elements of a ByteString except the last one. An exception will be thrown in the case of an empty ByteString.
init :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n\c)/ Return all the elements of a ByteString except the last one.
reverse :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
O(n) reverse xs efficiently returns the elements of xs in reverse order.
reverse :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) reverse xs returns the elements of xs in reverse order.
sort :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
O(n) Sort a ByteString efficiently, using counting sort.
tail :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(1) Extract the elements after the head of a ByteString, which must be non-empty.
tail :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString, bytestring Data.ByteString.Char8
O(1) Extract the elements after the head of a ByteString, which must be non-empty. An exception will be thrown in the case of an empty ByteString.
toStrict :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy, bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8
O(n) Convert a lazy ByteString into a strict ByteString. Note that this is an expensive operation that forces the whole lazy ByteString into memory and then copies all the data. If possible, try to avoid converting back and forth between strict and lazy bytestrings.
unsafeInit :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Unsafe
A variety of init for non-empty ByteStrings. unsafeInit omits the check for the empty case. As with unsafeHead, the programmer must provide a separate proof that the ByteString is non-empty.
unsafeTail :: ByteString -> ByteString
bytestring Data.ByteString.Unsafe
A variety of tail for non-empty ByteStrings. unsafeTail omits the check for the empty case. As with unsafeHead, the programmer must provide a separate proof that the ByteString is non-empty.
(>$<) :: Contravariant f => (b -> a) -> f a -> f b
bytestring Data.ByteString.Builder.Prim
A fmap-like operator for builder primitives, both bounded and fixed size. Builder primitives are contravariant so it's like the normal fmap, but backwards (look at the type). (If it helps to remember, the operator symbol is like ($) but backwards.) We can use it for example to prepend and/or append fixed values to an primitive. > showEncoding ((\x -> ('\'', (x, '\''))) >$< fixed3) 'x' = "'x'" > > fixed3 = char7 >*< char7 >*< char7 Note that the rather verbose syntax for composition stems from the requirement to be able to compute the size / size bound at compile time.
foldl :: (a -> Word8 -> a) -> a -> ByteString -> a
bytestring Data.ByteString.Lazy
foldl, applied to a binary operator, a starting value (typically the left-identity of the operator), and a ByteString, reduces the ByteString using the binary operator, from left to right.
foldl :: (a -> Word8 -> a) -> a -> ByteString -> a
bytestring Data.ByteString
foldl, applied to a binary operator, a starting value (typically the left-identity of the operator), and a ByteString, reduces the ByteString using the binary operator, from left to right. This function is subject to array fusion.

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