[a] -> a -> Bool

elem :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.List
elem is the list membership predicate, usually written in infix form, e.g., x `elem` xs. For the result to be False, the list must be finite; True, however, results from an element equal to x found at a finite index of a finite or infinite list.
notElem :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.List
notElem is the negation of elem.
isInfixOf :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
base Data.List
The isInfixOf function takes two lists and returns True iff the first list is contained, wholly and intact, anywhere within the second. Example: > isInfixOf "Haskell" "I really like Haskell." == True > isInfixOf "Ial" "I really like Haskell." == False
isPrefixOf :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
base Data.List
The isPrefixOf function takes two lists and returns True iff the first list is a prefix of the second.
isSuffixOf :: Eq a => [a] -> [a] -> Bool
base Data.List
The isSuffixOf function takes two lists and returns True iff the first list is a suffix of the second. Both lists must be finite.
buf_concat :: BufferOp a -> [a] -> a
HTTP Network.BufferType
elem :: (Foldable t, Eq a) => a -> t a -> Bool
base Data.Foldable
Does the element occur in the structure?
notElem :: (Foldable t, Eq a) => a -> t a -> Bool
base Data.Foldable
notElem is the negation of elem.
(!!) :: [a] -> Int -> a
base Prelude, base Data.List
List index (subscript) operator, starting from 0. It is an instance of the more general Data.List.genericIndex, which takes an index of any integral type.
asTypeOf :: a -> a -> a
base Prelude
asTypeOf is a type-restricted version of const. It is usually used as an infix operator, and its typing forces its first argument (which is usually overloaded) to have the same type as the second.
(<) :: Ord a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Ord
(<=) :: Ord a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Ord
(>) :: Ord a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Ord
(>=) :: Ord a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Ord
(/=) :: Eq a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Eq
(==) :: Eq a => a -> a -> Bool
base Prelude, base Data.Eq
geq :: Data a => a -> a -> Bool
syb Data.Generics.Twins
Generic equality: an alternative to "deriving Eq"
intersperse :: a -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersperse function takes an element and a list and `intersperses' that element between the elements of the list. For example, > intersperse ',' "abcde" == "a,b,c,d,e"
trace :: String -> a -> a
base Debug.Trace
When called, trace outputs the string in its first argument, before returning the second argument as its result. The trace function is not referentially transparent, and should only be used for debugging, or for monitoring execution. Some implementations of trace may decorate the string that's output to indicate that you're tracing. The function is implemented on top of putTraceMsg.
buf_isEmpty :: BufferOp a -> a -> Bool
HTTP Network.BufferType

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