(a -> b -> c) -> f a -> f b -> f c

liftM2 :: Monad m => (a1 -> a2 -> r) -> m a1 -> m a2 -> m r
base Control.Monad
Promote a function to a monad, scanning the monadic arguments from left to right. For example, > liftM2 (+) [0,1] [0,2] = [0,2,1,3] > liftM2 (+) (Just 1) Nothing = Nothing
liftA2 :: Applicative f => (a -> b -> c) -> f a -> f b -> f c
base Control.Applicative
Lift a binary function to actions.
intersectionWith :: (a -> b -> c) -> IntMap a -> IntMap b -> IntMap c
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n+m). The intersection with a combining function. > intersectionWith (++) (fromList [(5, "a"), (3, "b")]) (fromList [(5, "A"), (7, "C")]) == singleton 5 "aA"
zipWith :: (a -> b -> c) -> Seq a -> Seq b -> Seq c
containers Data.Sequence
O(min(n1,n2)). zipWith generalizes zip by zipping with the function given as the first argument, instead of a tupling function. For example, zipWith (+) is applied to two sequences to take the sequence of corresponding sums.
zipWith :: (a -> b -> c) -> [a] -> [b] -> [c]
base Prelude, base Data.List
zipWith generalises zip by zipping with the function given as the first argument, instead of a tupling function. For example, zipWith (+) is applied to two lists to produce the list of corresponding sums.
unionWith :: (a -> a -> a) -> IntMap a -> IntMap a -> IntMap a
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n+m). The union with a combining function. > unionWith (++) (fromList [(5, "a"), (3, "b")]) (fromList [(5, "A"), (7, "C")]) == fromList [(3, "b"), (5, "aA"), (7, "C")]
scanl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> Seq b -> Seq a
containers Data.Sequence
scanl is similar to foldl, but returns a sequence of reduced values from the left: > scanl f z (fromList [x1, x2, ...]) = fromList [z, z `f` x1, (z `f` x1) `f` x2, ...]
scanl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> [b] -> [a]
base Prelude, base Data.List
scanl is similar to foldl, but returns a list of successive reduced values from the left: > scanl f z [x1, x2, ...] == [z, z `f` x1, (z `f` x1) `f` x2, ...] Note that > last (scanl f z xs) == foldl f z xs.
scanr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> [b]
base Prelude, base Data.List
scanr is the right-to-left dual of scanl. Note that > head (scanr f z xs) == foldr f z xs.
scanr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> Seq a -> Seq b
containers Data.Sequence
scanr is the right-to-left dual of scanl.
isProperSubmapOfBy :: (a -> b -> Bool) -> IntMap a -> IntMap b -> Bool
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n+m). Is this a proper submap? (ie. a submap but not equal). The expression (isProperSubmapOfBy f m1 m2) returns True when m1 and m2 are not equal, all keys in m1 are in m2, and when f returns True when applied to their respective values. For example, the following expressions are all True: > isProperSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,1)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) > isProperSubmapOfBy (<=) (fromList [(1,1)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) But the following are all False: > isProperSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) > isProperSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) (fromList [(1,1)]) > isProperSubmapOfBy (<) (fromList [(1,1)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)])
isSubmapOfBy :: (a -> b -> Bool) -> IntMap a -> IntMap b -> Bool
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n+m). The expression (isSubmapOfBy f m1 m2) returns True if all keys in m1 are in m2, and when f returns True when applied to their respective values. For example, the following expressions are all True: > isSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,1)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) > isSubmapOfBy (<=) (fromList [(1,1)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) > isSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) But the following are all False: > isSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,2)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) > isSubmapOfBy (<) (fromList [(1,1)]) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) > isSubmapOfBy (==) (fromList [(1,1),(2,2)]) (fromList [(1,1)])
flip :: (a -> b -> c) -> b -> a -> c
base Prelude, base Data.Function
flip f takes its (first) two arguments in the reverse order of f.
foldl :: Foldable t => (a -> b -> a) -> a -> t b -> a
base Data.Foldable
foldl' :: Foldable t => (a -> b -> a) -> a -> t b -> a
base Data.Foldable
Fold over the elements of a structure, associating to the left, but strictly.
deleteFirstsBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The deleteFirstsBy function takes a predicate and two lists and returns the first list with the first occurrence of each element of the second list removed.
intersectBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The intersectBy function is the non-overloaded version of intersect.
unionBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] -> [a]
base Data.List
The unionBy function is the non-overloaded version of union.
foldl :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> IntMap b -> a
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n). Fold the values in the map using the given left-associative binary operator, such that foldl f z == foldl f z . elems. For example, > elems = reverse . foldl (flip (:)) [] > let f len a = len + (length a) > foldl f 0 (fromList [(5,"a"), (3,"bbb")]) == 4
foldl' :: (a -> b -> a) -> a -> IntMap b -> a
containers Data.IntMap.Strict, containers Data.IntMap.Lazy
O(n). A strict version of foldl. Each application of the operator is evaluated before using the result in the next application. This function is strict in the starting value.

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