<div dir="ltr"><div><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote"><pre>I&#39;d also recommend<br><br>   Richard Bird. Introduction to Functional Programming in Haskell.</pre>
</blockquote>&nbsp;Added to my list, thank you.<br></div><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote"><pre>While not directly related, taking math courses improves your Haskell skills <br>
automatically :) Discrete mathematics is the umbrella term for the math you <br>want, which includes things like graph theory, combinatorics and logic. <br>Intuitionistic logic and type theory are directly related to Haskell.</pre>
</blockquote><div><br>Looking at the way the classes are structured, apparently most of these classes have a single, identical pre-requisite. Maybe I should bump one of my fall classes back to spring so that I can take the pre-req in the fall, and take a few of those before I graduate. Hm...<br>
<br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote"><pre>Try some problems at<br><br>   <a href="http://projecteuler.net/">http://projecteuler.net/</a></pre>
&nbsp;</blockquote><div><br>I&#39;ve done one or two. I remember getting stuck on a problem involving prime numbers, due to not generating them efficiently enough to have it run in any reasonable amount of time. Maybe I&#39;ll dust that off and ask for help here.<br>
</div></div></div>