<div dir="ltr">Hi all,<div><br></div><div>I think i will love this list :)&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Yesterday I was looking at this Haskell&nbsp;Exercises&nbsp;for&nbsp;beginners&nbsp;[1] and got somewhat stuck at Ex nbr 2 , here&#39;s why:</div>
<div>The idea of this exercises is that you don&#39;t use built in Haskell Lists, so no pattern matching, instead you have to use the data type list provided in the source of the exercise.</div><div><br></div><div>My friend who is more advanced in Haskell said this approach is good because you get to learn natural Transformations. So I googled that and I came up with this [2]. I can read al little bit of category theory but I would love to know how to apply [2] in the sum exercise.&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div><div>Anyway as we all know summing all the elements in a list using Haskell lists is trivial :</div><div><br></div><div>sum :: [Int] -&gt; Int</div><div>sum (xs) = foldr(+)0xs</div><div><br></div><div>But how to do it with Natural transformations ???&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div><div>Thanks a lot</div><div><br></div><div>Federico</div><div><br></div><div>[1]&nbsp;<a href="http://blog.tmorris.net/haskell-exercises-for-beginners/">http://blog.tmorris.net/haskell-exercises-for-beginners/</a></div>
<div><div><div><br>-- <br>Federico Brubacher<br><a href="http://www.fbrubacher.com">www.fbrubacher.com</a><br><br>Colonial Duty Free Shop<br><a href="http://www.colonial.com.uy">www.colonial.com.uy</a>
</div></div></div></div>