On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 4:28 AM, Will Ness <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:will_n48@yahoo.com">will_n48@yahoo.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">Michael Easter &lt;codetojoy &lt;at&gt; <a href="http://gmail.com" target="_blank">gmail.com</a>&gt; writes:<br></div>...<br>
After all, we can have a definition of such a value, and have it run multiple<br>
times for us, so _as definition_ it&#39;s no different than any other definition in<br>
Haskell. It&#39;s just that _its value_ can cause the system to actually perform<br>
these IO actions in some circumstances.</blockquote><div><br>But it isn&#39;t a definition.  &quot;Reference&quot; would be better; &quot;getChar&quot; is a term that references a value. <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br>
As for terminology: we&#39;ve got to have some special name for functions that are<br>
chainable by bind. Calling them actions confuses them with the real world<br>
actions performed by IO.<br>
</blockquote><div><br>Correction:  special name for IO &quot;functions&quot; (actually &quot;IO terms&quot; would be better).  The monad just organizes stuff, so the IO monad, as monad, is no different than any other monad. <br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br>
May be to call them &quot;action functions&quot;?<br>
<div></div></blockquote><div><br>This was a big problem for me; I find terms like &quot;action&quot;, &quot;computation&quot;, &quot;function&quot; completely misleading for IO terms/values.  You might find <a href="http://syntax.wikidot.com/blog:5">&quot;Computation&quot; considered harmful. &quot;Value&quot; not so hot either</a> useful; see also the comment &quot;Another try at the key sentence&quot;.  There are a few other articles on the blog that address this terminology problem.<br>
</div></div><br>-gregg<br>