It&#39;s not for the faint of heart, but the enumerator package is also supposed to provide very good performance for stream transformations. I&#39;ve looked at it a bit myself but I&#39;m still struggling to wrap my head around the types involved, which like most things in Haskell is the key to understanding the whole thing.<br>
<br clear="all">-R. Kyle Murphy<br>--<br>Curiosity was framed, Ignorance killed the cat.<br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Sep 24, 2011 at 05:01, Benjamin Edwards <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:edwards.benj@gmail.com">edwards.benj@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<p>You should look up bytestring and friends on hackage.</p>
<p>If it is something quite simple you can use the lazy variants and provided that you don&#39;t try to hold onto the input you should get nice constant space without trying too hard.</p>
<p>I recommend the early chapters on IO in real world haskell if you want more info on lazy IO.</p><div><div></div><div class="h5">
<div class="gmail_quote">On 24 Sep 2011 03:06, &quot;anyzhen&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:jiangzhen3s@qq.com" target="_blank">jiangzhen3s@qq.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br type="attribution">&gt; consider this :<br>&gt; i want load a 4G file(or some bigger file) ,and the process  data operation just like  010 to 101( XOR bits  ) , is it some efficient function down it ?<br>

&gt; such  hPutStr  hPutChar is Char layer   , is exist bit layer operations?<br>&gt; <br>&gt; <br>&gt; thanks for any help <br>&gt; <br>&gt; <br>&gt; <a href="mailto:jiangzhen3s@qq.com" target="_blank">jiangzhen3s@qq.com</a><br>
</div>
</div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Beginners mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Beginners@haskell.org">Beginners@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>