<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:dt="uuid:C2F41010-65B3-11d1-A29F-00AA00C14882" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"><head><meta name="Microsoft Theme 2.00" content="Clear Day 011"><meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"><meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)"><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Wingdings;
        panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Wingdings;
        panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:"Comic Sans MS";
        panose-1:3 15 7 2 3 3 2 2 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoPlainText, li.MsoPlainText, div.MsoPlainText
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-style-link:"Plain Text Char";
        margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:10.5pt;
        font-family:"Comic Sans MS";}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-compose;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:windowtext;}
span.PlainTextChar
        {mso-style-name:"Plain Text Char";
        mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-style-link:"Plain Text";
        font-family:"Comic Sans MS";}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--></head><body lang=EN-US link=blue vlink=purple><div class=WordSection1><p class=MsoNormal>I always enjoy and tout the clarity and simplicity of the declarative style of functional programming, and with that also Haskell.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>But it seems that although the wonderfully short and clear examples dominate early learning and usage, the forums like this and café are dominated by examples more like this:<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     import Data.Enumerator (run_, ($$), (=$))<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     import Data.Enumerator.Binary (enumHandle, iterHandle)<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     import Data.Enumerator.List as EL (map)<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     import Data.ByteString as B (map)<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     import Data.Bits (complement)<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     import System.IO (withFile, IOMode(..))<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     main = withFile &quot;infile&quot; ReadMode $ \inh -&gt; withFile &quot;outfile&quot;<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>     WriteMode $ \outh -&gt; do<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoPlainText>         run_ (enumHandle 4096 inh $$ EL.map (B.map complement) =$ iterHandle outh)<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>And many more &#8211; looks more like APL or Perl to me. <span style='font-family:Wingdings'>J</span> Certainly not the Python&#8217;ish model of &#8220;anyone can read this, and it is clear what it does&#8221;.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>Seems like the assertion that FP is easier and more clear is true at introductory levels, but there are some subsequent big gradients in the learning and usage curve. I use it only in very simple and small programs, so wondered about the observations on this from more experienced experts.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>I wonder if any studies have been done to quantify and measure the complexity of programs in Haskell, as a way to assess this property.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div></body></html>