I&#39;m curious as to what it is about learnyouahaskell and other similar tutorials that makes them &quot;ridiculous&quot;. I found LYAH very helpful when I wanted to actually learn how to get useful things done in Haskell without taking a year off to read about theory. If that approach is ridiculous then I think our definitions of that word differ.<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Sep 24, 2011 at 10:45 PM, Christopher Howard <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:christopher.howard@frigidcode.com">christopher.howard@frigidcode.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
On 09/24/2011 09:12 PM, Mike Meyer wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
Actually, functional programming and the higher math are separate<br>
things. Haskell (and I expect the similar languages) have a lot of<br>
math in their documentation. But that&#39;s not true for other functional<br>
languages, like Clojure or Scheme. With a background in those<br>
languages, I didn&#39;t have much trouble with the functional nature of<br>
haskell. But I&#39;m still trying to recall the graduate math courses I<br>
took long time ago in a state far, far different from today.<br>
<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
Really? I&#39;ll confess I&#39;m a bit surprised to hear that perspective. I don&#39;t know anything about Clojure or Scheme. But I found in trying to understand Haskell that it really is all about higher math. Once I finally gave up on &quot;learnyouahaskell&quot; and other ridiculous tutorials, I found the real functional programming textbooks, and discovered that it all starts with lambda calculus; all the explanations are given in set theory notation, with occasionally comparisons to integral and differential calculus for illustration, with very specific rules regarding substitution and reduction and normal forms. I&#39;m still trying to figure out what all those combinators are about! And it is all rested on mathematical proofs, usually inductive.<br>

<br>
And that is just the lambda calculus aspect. Then we move on to type theory (!!!) plus the various types of polymorphism, and then on to a number of other topics that I don&#39;t know enough about to even mention intelligibly.<div>
<div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
-- <br>
<a href="http://frigidcode.com" target="_blank">frigidcode.com</a><br>
<a href="http://theologia.indicium.us" target="_blank">theologia.indicium.us</a><br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Beginners mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Beginners@haskell.org" target="_blank">Beginners@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/beginners</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Michael Xavier<br><a href="http://www.michaelxavier.net" target="_blank">http://www.michaelxavier.net</a><div><a href="http://www.linkedin.com/pub/michael-xavier/13/b02/a26" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a></div>
<br>