<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 16 April 2012 17:46, Nikita Beloglazov <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:nikita@taste-o-code.com">nikita@taste-o-code.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Hi. <br>I&#39;m building website where people can try and &quot;taste&quot; new languages by solving small or mediums size tasks. Tasks are language specific and should show best features of the language. Website is not meant to teach new language but to give idea what is this language good for.<br>



Now I want to add Haskell. I need about 7-10 tasks for now. First three of four tasks are introductory, they should show/check basics of haskell. E.g. given n, return sum of squares of first n even numbers. Other tasks are more complicated and show advantages of functional programming in general or some specific haskell features.<br>
</blockquote></div><br>I&#39;d say that&#39;s the wrong criteria for a set of tasks and solutions. A better one would be to structure the list of tasks so that it teaches people what they need to know to write a fair range of programs in Haskell. This means working out what the main intellectual hurdles are in Haskell and structuring problems around them. So some &quot;koans&quot; as well as pieces designed to show &quot;advantages&quot;,<br>
<br><br>