<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"><head><meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)"><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Tahoma;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:#1F497D;
        text-decoration:none none;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--></head><body lang=EN-US link=blue vlink=purple><div class=WordSection1><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:13.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:13.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'>“Y</span>ou might find it easier to use languages like Perl, Python, or Ruby…”<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>In a nutshell, which of these to start with?  I’m totally clueless.  And it all seems so daunting.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>Yes, I’m a big user of little nifty tools/utilities you programmers put out, free to the world.  It’s simply amazing what you programmers accomplish.  I’m always searching the web to find new ones.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>But it would be terrific to be able to do some of that myself – if I could find a good practical ‘tool’ to make my own little tools, to extemporaneously cobble together as needed.<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>Nicholas<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:13.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:13.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1F497D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'>From:</span></b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'> Joseph Fredette [mailto:jfredett@gmail.com] <br><b>Sent:</b> Friday, April 27, 2012 3:06 PM<br><b>To:</b> nkormanik@gmail.com<br><b>Cc:</b> beginners@haskell.org<br><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Haskell-beginners] Haskell as a useful practical 'tool' for intelligent non-programmers<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><div><p class=MsoNormal>It seems to me that what you're looking for is a way to build tools suited to particular tasks, subject to particular performance constraints. If you're goal is to be able to build these tools yourself, I would say that, by definition, you are intending to be a programmer; inasmuch as a programmer is a person who's job is to build tools using a tool-building tool.<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>To that end, I recommend Haskell as a good language to use to build performant tools, especially for stuff like data-analysis, where speed is a factor. Branching out from there, you may want to look at and learn about Hadoop and similar technologies, MapReduce is a very powerful tool for large-scale data analytics.<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>Along those lines, languages like R are optimized for datacrunching and data visualization, and are certainly worth learning about.<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>So, in essence, I guess I'd say that if you're intention is to learn about practical, generic tools; then by definition your intention _is_ to be a programmer, and therefore you may want to consider approaching the problem from that point of view.<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>If your goal is merely to consume tools -- perhaps writing a small amount of code, you (I think) still have intention (if unseen) to be a programmer, but you might find it easier to use languages like Perl, Python, or Ruby -- which have large standard libraries, good ability to function as &quot;glue&quot; and low syntactic and semantic overhead (that is to say, they're a bit easier to write) than some languages (eg, Erlang, Haskell, R, etc.)<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>That's not to say it's hard to write good code in the latter set of languages, merely that it requires (I think) more understanding of a potentially more complicated model (especially true with haskell).<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>I don't know if that answers your question, I hope it helps.<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>/Joe<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal style='margin-bottom:12.0pt'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><div><p class=MsoNormal>On Fri, Apr 27, 2012 at 4:16 PM, Nicholas Kormanik &lt;<a href="mailto:nkormanik@gmail.com" target="_blank">nkormanik@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><br>I am not a programmer, and have no intention of becoming one. I'm a stock<br>and options trader. MetaStock is one of the primary programs I use. Other<br>statistical and mathematical programs as well.<br><br>Very often when some small need arises, I Google-search for a solution.<br>There seems to be any number of freeware utilities out there in cyberland --<br>and more all the time -- that do pretty much whatever is needed.<br><br>Additionally, Mathematica (as one example) has a powerful programming<br>language built in.<br><br>So, my question is: Does it make practical sense to spend time learning<br>Haskell for the purpose of adding it to my assortment of 'tools' -- to<br>quickly do this or that, as the need arises?<br><br>Is there any better general practical 'tool' (or, if you want, 'programming<br>language') to add to my arsenal.<br><br>Thanks for your comments and suggestions.<br><br>Nicholas Kormanik<br><br><br><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>Beginners mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Beginners@haskell.org">Beginners@haskell.org</a><br><a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners</a><o:p></o:p></p></div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p></div></div></body></html>