<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 27 April 2012 21:16, Nicholas Kormanik <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:nkormanik@gmail.com" target="_blank">nkormanik@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
<br>
So, my question is: Does it make practical sense to spend time learning<br>
Haskell for the purpose of adding it to my assortment of &#39;tools&#39; -- to<br>
quickly do this or that, as the need arises?<br>
<br>
Is there any better general practical &#39;tool&#39; (or, if you want, &#39;programming<br>
language&#39;) to add to my arsenal.<br></blockquote></div><br>No one can give you advice on what tool to use without knowing what the task or who you are in more detail than you provided. And you&#39;re often better with several tools than &quot;general&quot; one - trying to saw with a hammer isn&#39;t easy.<br>
<br>Unless you&#39;re unusually smart in the IQ sense and/or have a maths or formal logic background, then I&#39;d say that Haskell would be a miserable choice for a first programming language.<br><br>As for tools you might look at for tasks that I ***guess*** that a trader is likely to want to do:<br>
<br>- For web scraping and text mining, Groovy, Clojure, Ruby, Python and (maybe) Perl are reasonable choices<br><br>- For both number crunching and symbolic maths, look at sagemaths (which is scripted in Python) - it&#39;s a reasonable free alternative to both Matlab (number crunching) and Mathematic (symbolics)<br>
<br>..Which I suppose makes Python the no-brainer choice. Python is easy to learn, the community is supportive, there are lots of reasonable books and tutorials. I think it also has stuff around for working with Excel spreadsheets, which I&#39;d imagine you might want to do.<br>
<br>Haskell is actually a better language than any of the above (leaving aside learnability and without defining &quot;better&quot;) but for real world use libraries count more than language features. It would take you years to write the equivalent of sagemaths in Haskell, which rather negates Haskell&#39;s advantages if you need that functionality.<br>