<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 28 April 2012 22:50, Nicholas Kormanik <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:nkormanik@gmail.com" target="_blank">nkormanik@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div link="blue" vlink="purple" lang="EN-US"><div><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d"><u></u><u></u></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d">Greatly appreciate your sharing these thoughts.<u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d"><u></u><u></u></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d">A bit frustrating that you mention four as candidates: </span>Groovy, Clojure, Ruby, Python.<u></u><u></u></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d"><u></u><u></u></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d">But it sounds like you are leaning toward recommending Python as the best way to start. <u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d"><u></u><u></u></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d">Nicholas<u></u><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d"><u></u></span></p></div></div></blockquote><div><br>No. I&#39;m the person who mentioned all four of those as examples of languages that are good for web scraping. I then went on to say that given what I **guess** you might need to do that Python is the &quot;no-brainer&quot; best. You really don&#39;t say enough for anyone to be sure though - if you want to implement some very time consuming numerical algorithms and have them run fast then CUDA might be the only option. (In which case you&#39;re probably out of luck, because CUDA programming isn&#39;t for amateurs.) Or for less demanding numerics centred around stats and matrix ops, the R could be a better choice than Python and Sagemaths:<br>
<br><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_%28programming_language%29">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_%28programming_language%29</a><br><br>..and R will webscrape too:<br><br><a href="http://www.programmingr.com/content/webscraping-using-readlines-and-rcurl">http://www.programmingr.com/content/webscraping-using-readlines-and-rcurl</a><br>
<br>If you want to do stuff like time series analysis then you&#39;ll probably find more books and papers using R:<br><br><a href="http://www.stat.pitt.edu/stoffer/tsa2/R_time_series_quick_fix.htm">http://www.stat.pitt.edu/stoffer/tsa2/R_time_series_quick_fix.htm</a><br>
<br><br>&gt;&gt; Mike Meyer: Ruby makes a bad fit if Haskell is a goal (and that&#39;s a good goal)<br><br>I don&#39;t see it as being a goal for this guy! He just wants to be able to write utilities he needs without bogging down in &quot;becoming a programmer.&quot;<br>
<br>&gt;&gt; While Clojure is a<br>
great language, the most popular implementation is hooked into the<br>
JVM, and you wind up needing to deal with a lot Java infrastructure<br>
fairly quickly. Being able to use that infrastructure is a design<br>
goal, but adds to the learning curve. I haven&#39;t looked into Groovy,<br>
but suspect some of the same issues will arise (and hope a Groovy<br>
programmer will correct me if I&#39;m wrong).&lt;&lt;<br><br>I played around with Groovy for a weekend to write some utilities and a music generation program. I can&#39;t remember having to put any effort into &quot;needing to deal with a lot Java infrastructure,&quot; even though I was using a midi library written for pure Java. But I&#39;m not really sure what you mean (installing a Java compiler?? doesn&#39;t seem like a lot) and it doesn&#39;t matter - Python/Sagemaths and R seem like the most reasonable tools without spending big money.<br>
<br>Re. the OP&#39;s needs: learning a programming language isn&#39;t enough to write programs that work correctly. You will need to learn how to design and debug code if you&#39;re writing more than very trivial apps. Take a look at something like Kernighan and Pike&#39;s &quot;The Practice Of Programming.&quot; There is no magic language that let&#39;s you write code &quot;without becoming a programmer.&quot; Some are easier to learn than others or offer more functionality in particular areas, but writing even moderately complex programs that really work - rather than just seeming to - requires reasonable practice, some book knowledge, and lots of discipline. Programs are treacherous and deceptive and it requires skill just to verify that they are working reliably. <br>
<br><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div link="blue" vlink="purple" lang="EN-US"><div><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:rgb(31,73,125)"><u></u></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:13.0pt;font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;;color:#1f497d"><u></u><u></u></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><b><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Tahoma&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;">From:</span></b><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:&quot;Tahoma&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;"> umptious [mailto:<a href="mailto:umptious@gmail.com" target="_blank">umptious@gmail.com</a>] <br>
<b>Sent:</b> Saturday, April 28, 2012 9:39 AM</span></p><div class="im"><br><b>To:</b> <a href="mailto:nkormanik@gmail.com" target="_blank">nkormanik@gmail.com</a><br><b>Cc:</b> <a href="mailto:beginners@haskell.org" target="_blank">beginners@haskell.org</a><br>
<b>Subject:</b> Re: [Haskell-beginners] Haskell as a useful practical &#39;tool&#39; for intelligent non-programmers<u></u><u></u></div><p></p><p class="MsoNormal"><u></u><u></u></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt">
<u></u><u></u></p><div><p class="MsoNormal">On 27 April 2012 21:16, Nicholas Kormanik &lt;<a href="mailto:nkormanik@gmail.com" target="_blank">nkormanik@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<u></u><u></u></p><div><div class="h5"><p class="MsoNormal">
<br><br>So, my question is: Does it make practical sense to spend time learning<br>Haskell for the purpose of adding it to my assortment of &#39;tools&#39; -- to<br>quickly do this or that, as the need arises?<br><br>Is there any better general practical &#39;tool&#39; (or, if you want, &#39;programming<br>
language&#39;) to add to my arsenal.<u></u><u></u></p></div></div></div><div><div class="h5"><p class="MsoNormal"><br>No one can give you advice on what tool to use without knowing what the task or who you are in more detail than you provided. And you&#39;re often better with several tools than &quot;general&quot; one - trying to saw with a hammer isn&#39;t easy.<br>
<br>Unless you&#39;re unusually smart in the IQ sense and/or have a maths or formal logic background, then I&#39;d say that Haskell would be a miserable choice for a first programming language.<br><br>As for tools you might look at for tasks that I ***guess*** that a trader is likely to want to do:<br>
<br>- For web scraping and text mining, Groovy, Clojure, Ruby, Python and (maybe) Perl are reasonable choices<br><br>- For both number crunching and symbolic maths, look at sagemaths (which is scripted in Python) - it&#39;s a reasonable free alternative to both Matlab (number crunching) and Mathematic (symbolics)<br>
<br>..Which I suppose makes Python the no-brainer choice. Python is easy to learn, the community is supportive, there are lots of reasonable books and tutorials. I think it also has stuff around for working with Excel spreadsheets, which I&#39;d imagine you might want to do.<br>
<br>Haskell is actually a better language than any of the above (leaving aside learnability and without defining &quot;better&quot;) but for real world use libraries count more than language features. It would take you years to write the equivalent of sagemaths in Haskell, which rather negates Haskell&#39;s advantages if you need that functionality.<u></u><u></u></p>
</div></div></div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Beginners mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Beginners@haskell.org">Beginners@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>