With python (and any other non-compiled language for that matter) the unit testing is very┬áimportant. ┬áI almost think of the unit tests as the compiler (does that make sense to anyone but me?).<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">
On Wed, Sep 19, 2012 at 3:15 PM, Dennis Raddle <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:dennis.raddle@gmail.com" target="_blank">dennis.raddle@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
As a somewhat-newbie haskell user and longtime Python user, what I have observed is this.<br><br>Haskell creates compile-time error messages that are somewhat hard to understand for beginners.<br><br>Python (or any scripting language) creates run-time bugs that are hard to understand.<br>

<br>One reason for the weird (to a beginner) compile errors in Haskell is its expressivity -- almost any sequence of identifiers could potentially mean something, and if you make a mistake, the compiler is sure to find some &quot;weird&quot; way to interpret it.<br>

<br>But Python suffers from a similar problem -- it&#39;s not as expressive a language, but it is very permissive, not insisting on type correctness, order of arguments, or any of a number of things so that the programmer can write a program that compiles with no errors -- but has strange run-time bugs.<br>

<br>I&#39;ll take Haskell. I&#39;m a bit OCD about getting the bugs out of my programs, and Python just opens up too many holes for me to relax with it.<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br><br>Dennis<br><br><br>
<br>
</font></span><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Beginners mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Beginners@haskell.org">Beginners@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>David Hinkes<br>