Just anecdotally I remember we had this problem with Accelerate.<div><br></div><div>Back when we were using it last Spring for some reason we were forced by the API to at least nominally go through lists on our way to the GPU -- which we sorely hoped were deforested!  At times (and somewhat unpredictably), we&#39;d be faced enormous execution times and memory footprints as the runtime tried to create gigantic lists for feeding to Accelerate.</div>


<div><br></div><div>Other than that -- I like having a nice literal syntax for other types.  But I&#39;m not sure that I construct literals for Sets and IntMaps often enough to profit much...</div><div><br></div><div>  -Ryan</div>


<div><br></div><div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 9:38 AM, Roman Leshchinskiy <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rl@cse.unsw.edu.au" target="_blank">rl@cse.unsw.edu.au</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div>George Giorgidze wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; This extension could also be used for giving data-parallel array literals<br>
&gt; instead of the special syntax used currently.<br>
<br>
</div>Unfortunately, it couldn&#39;t. DPH array literals don&#39;t (and can&#39;t really) go<br>
through lists.<br>
<br>
In general, if we are going to overload list literals then forcing the<br>
desugaring to always go through lists seems wrong to me. There are plenty<br>
of data structures where that might result in a significant performance<br>
hit.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
Roman<br>
</font><div><div></div><div><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Glasgow-haskell-users mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Glasgow-haskell-users@haskell.org" target="_blank">Glasgow-haskell-users@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/glasgow-haskell-users" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/glasgow-haskell-users</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>