Currying - Curry function

Konst Sushenko [email protected]
Tue, 7 Aug 2001 15:58:01 -0700


to check whether I myself understand currying correctly:

currying is not partial application (as the example below seems to
suggest), it is conversion of a function in to a form where partial
application is possible.

so we can say that

 g =3D curry f

is a curried function.

right?

konst


: -----Original Message-----
: From: Ashley Yakeley [mailto:[email protected]]=20
: Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2001 3:46 PM
: To: Mark Carroll; Haskell Cafe List
: Subject: Re: Currying - Curry function
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: At 2001-08-07 14:20, Mark Carroll wrote:
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: >> Is there an exemple of such a function in the Haskell language ?
: >
: >Most certainly. For instance, we can define:
: >
: >	f :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer
: >	f x y =3D x + y
: >
: >	g =3D f 1
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: That's not really currying, is it? This is currying:
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: f :: (Integer,Integer) -> Integer
: f (x,y) =3D x + y
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: g :: Integer -> Integer
: g y =3D f (1,y)
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: -- g is f with the first argument curried with 1.
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: h :: Integer -> Integer
: h x =3D f (x,1)
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: -- h is f with the second argument curried with 1.
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: And these are the functions for the first of two arguments:
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: curry :: ((a,b) -> c) -> (a -> b -> c)
: curry f a b =3D f (a,b)
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: uncurry :: (a -> b -> c) -> ((a,b) -> c)
: uncurry f (a,b) =3D f a b
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: ... so that we can define
: g =3D curry f 1
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: --=20
: Ashley Yakeley, Seattle WA
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