<HTML><BODY style="word-wrap: break-word; -khtml-nbsp-mode: space; -khtml-line-break: after-white-space; "><BR><DIV><DIV>On 12 sept. 05, at 00:50, Ralf Lammel wrote:</DIV><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><BR><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">- XML wasn't mentioned in your message. I wonder whether they discuss it</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">in the actual thread. (Yes, you might be saying XML is not the same</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><P style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 18.0px 0.0px"><FONT class="Apple-style-span" face="Times" size="5"><SPAN class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><BR></SPAN></FONT></P></BLOCKQUOTE><DIV>Yes, fowler mentionned XML:</DIV> "XML has its uses, but isn't exactly easy to read. We could make it easier to see what's going on by using a custom syntax. Perhaps like this:"</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV><DIV>I dont think XML is a good idea for files that are managed/edited by humans.</DIV><DIV>Of course the job of the programmer is easier when the file is coded in XML, but I think the user prefer simpler files with a custom syntax, and</DIV><DIV>the user is the king.</DIV><DIV>I am a programmer and personnaly I dont want to code my haskell code in XML, so I presume it is the same for the user with configuration files. </DIV><BR><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">language as you are programming in, but it so easy to process XML in</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">many languages, and one uses XSD for the DSL syntax). In fact, in</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">Haskell I would strongly consider using HaXML or similar technology for</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">non-trivial configuration problems. XML makes configuration also more</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">portable. In reality, I don't see much value in using the programming</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">language syntax for representing the configuration information. This</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">makes it only harder to process those configurations with other tools.</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; min-height: 14px; "><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>Well except if your programming langage is lisp in which case parsing the configuration file is </DIV><DIV>just a call to read.</DIV><BR><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; min-height: 14px; "></DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">Ralf</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; min-height: 14px; "><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></BODY></HTML>