<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 3/27/07, <b class="gmail_sendername"><a href="mailto:Dave@haskell.org">Dave@haskell.org</a></b> &lt;<a href="mailto:Dave@haskell.org">Dave@haskell.org</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Given the amount of material posted at <a href="http://haskell.org">haskell.org</a> and elsewhere<br>explaining IO, monads and functors, has anyone considered publishing<br>a comprehensive book explaining those subjects?&nbsp;&nbsp;(I am trying to
<br>read all the material online, but books are easier to read and don&#39;t<br>require sitting in front of a computer to do so. Plus I can write in<br>books :-). )</blockquote><div><br>Well, how much in depth are you interested in getting?&nbsp; I started reading Categories for the Working Mathematician a couple of months ago, and while it sometimes takes a bit of work it&#39;s a very good introduction.&nbsp; The only caution I have is that if you don&#39;t have that strong of a math background, or hadn&#39;t done it in a few years (like myself), you may have to lookup a lot of definitions in order to understand his examples.&nbsp; Wikipedia usually provides enough of a detailed description that you can get the point.
<br></div><br></div><br>