I&#39;m afraid I must agree with you a little.&nbsp; Many people use lists when a different data structure would have been better.&nbsp; It&#39;s a pity, because Haskell provides a large number of different data structures.<br><br><div>
<span class="gmail_quote">On 6/19/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Andrew Coppin</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:andrewcoppin@btinternet.com">andrewcoppin@btinternet.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Jens Fisseler wrote:<br>&gt; The equivalent of Haskell&#39;s list data type would be the array type of most<br>&gt; imperative or object-oriented languages. Both are some sort of basic<br>&gt; collection type, good for their own sake, but if you want more
<br>&gt; specialized collection types, you have to implement them.<br>&gt;<br><br>Maybe it&#39;s just a culture thing then... In your typical OOP language,<br>you spend five minutes thinking &quot;now, what collection type shall I use
<br>here?&quot; before going on to actually write the code. In Haskell, you just<br>go &quot;OK, so I&#39;ll put a list here...&quot;<br><br>_______________________________________________<br>Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br><a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br></blockquote></div><br>