<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 7/9/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Dan Piponi</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:dpiponi@gmail.com">dpiponi@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On 7/8/07, Thomas Conway &lt;<a href="mailto:drtomc@gmail.com">drtomc@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>&gt; The basic claim appears to be that discrete mathematics is a bad<br>&gt; foundation for computer science. I suspect the subscribers to this
<br>&gt; list would beg to disagree.<br><br>Wearing my tin foil hat for the moment, I think that there is a<br>conspiracy by some computer scientists to drive a wedge between<br>mathematicians and computer scientists. You can see hints of it in
<br>many places where both mathematicians and computer scientists hang out<br>and there have been quite a few recent articles setting up mathematics<br>and computer science as somehow in competition with each other.<br><br>
Many of the structures studied by mathematicians are algebraic. Many<br>of the structures studied by computer scientists are coalgebraic (eg.<br>the web itself can be seen as a vast coalgebraic structure). </blockquote><div>
<br>Okay Mr. Piponi, as a math geek I can&#39;t let that comment about the web slide without further explanation.&nbsp; Is it just the idea that coalgebras can capture the idea of side affects (a -&gt; F a) or is there something more specific that you&#39;re thinking of?
<br></div><br></div><br>