<div><span class="gmail_quote">On 7/22/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Neil Mitchell</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:ndmitchell@gmail.com">ndmitchell@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
However, if we use the rule that &quot;anywhere we encounter span (not . g)<br>we can replace it with break g&quot; then we can redefine break as:<br><br>break g = break g<br><br></blockquote></div><br>For some reason this reminds me of the paradoxes of being able to go back in time.&nbsp; What I mean is:
<br><br>- as long as we&#39;ve defined break g = span (not . g), then we can go around replacing everywhere in our program &quot;span(not.g)&quot; with &quot;break g&quot;... unless we happen to replace the &quot;span(not.g
)&quot; of the break definition itself... at which point the break definition no longer exists... and so the replaces we just made are invalid... including the replace of the break definition itself... etc<br><br>... which, for the going back in time thing is like:
<br>- we go back in time, and change something so we no longer invent the time machine<br>- ... which means we never invent the time machine<br>- ... and never go back in time<br>- ... and so we do invent the time machine
<br><br>