<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 8/17/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Kim-Ee Yeoh</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:a.biurvOir4@asuhan.com">a.biurvOir4@asuhan.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br><br>Lennart Augustsson wrote:<br>&gt;<br>&gt; And as a previous poster showed, ghc does concatenate strings.<br>&gt;<br><br>And Haskell (as in the current language definition) does not.<br>I was talking about Haskell.
</blockquote><div><br>Haskell says nothing about compile time or run time in the language definition.&nbsp; Nor does it say exactly when things are evaluated.&nbsp; Even the tag line for Haskell says &quot;non-strict&quot; rather than lazy.
<br>So Haskell semantics allows many evaluation strategies, and evaluating terminating constant expression at compile time is certainly one of them.&nbsp; You don&#39;t have to, but it&#39;s permissible.<br><br>&nbsp; -- Lennart<br>
<br></div><br></div><br>