<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<br>
Just to clarify, I know it was my mistake, and so I'm not blaming
Haskell or Ghc. The first few times you realise the compiler isn't a
magic wand that stops you being silly are the hardest.<br>
<br>
Jamie Love wrote:
<blockquote cite="mid:479E5A4E.8040101@aviarc.com.au" type="cite">
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
Oh, I see<br>
  <br>
I wasn't thinking through the code (and I'm still in the honeymoon
phase with Haskell, thinking it can do no wrong).<br>
  <br>
Don Stewart wrote:
  <blockquote cite="mid:20080128223549.GK11295@scytale.galois.com"
 type="cite">
    <pre wrap="">jamie.love:
  </pre>
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">   Ah, of course.

   Thanks. I removed the hPut and it runs smoothly.  I had forgotten that
   haskell chooses the types dynamically.

   Shouldn't haskell pick up that there is no 'mod' for Word8?  I mean,
   shouldn't I get a nicer error message?
    </pre>
    </blockquote>
    <pre wrap=""><!---->
Well, it inferred Word8 for your generated values, so 256 overflowed to 0.
Stating the expected type here would prevent that. (And is why mandatory 
top level declarations are good -- they can prevent bugs caused by 
an unexpected type being inferred).
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
</blockquote>
<br>
</body>
<br />-- 
<br />This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content 
<br>by
<a href="http://www.mailscanner.info"><b>MailScanner</b></a>  and is believed to be clean.
</html>