I&#39;m not sure what you mean by &quot;the strictness analyzer&quot;.&nbsp; GHC&#39;s strictness analyzer?<br>I don&#39;t know, but I would hope so since it was done already in 1980 by Alan Mycroft.<br><br>&nbsp; -- Lennart<br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Feb 9, 2008 at 4:33 PM, Peter Verswyvelen &lt;<a href="mailto:bf3@telenet.be">bf3@telenet.be</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Consider the function<br>
<br>
cond x y z = if x then y else z<br>
<br>
I guess we can certainly say cond is strict in x.<br>
<br>
But what about y and z?<br>
<br>
If x is true, &nbsp;then cond is strict in y<br>
If x is false, then cond is strict in z<br>
<br>
So we can&#39;t really say cond is lazy nor strict in its second or third argument.<br>
<br>
Of course, this is the case for many more functions, but in &nbsp;the case of the if-then-else primitive, does the strictness analyzer make use of this &quot;mutually exclusive strictness&quot; fact?<br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
Peter<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>