My dream would be to write the high-level thing *and* some high-level, composable specification of my performance requirements.&nbsp; If the compiler can&#39;t meet the requirements, then it tells me so, together with helpful information about what broke down.&nbsp; Using the error message, I then add some annotations and/or tweak my code and try again.&nbsp; Just like static type-checking.<br>
<br>&nbsp; - Conal<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, May 16, 2008 at 12:04 PM, Don Stewart &lt;<a href="mailto:dons@galois.com">dons@galois.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">
[...]<br>
And the point is that it is *reliable*. If you make your money day in, day out<br>
writing Haskell, and you don&#39;t want to rely on radical transformations for<br>
correctness, this is a sensible idiom to follow.<br></blockquote></div><br>