<div dir="ltr">On Fri, Aug 1, 2008 at 3:45 PM, Eric Kow <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:eric.kow@gmail.com">eric.kow@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Dear Haskellers,<br>
<br>
I would like to take an informal poll for the purposes of darcs<br>
recruitment. &nbsp;Could you please complete this sentence for me?<br>
<br>
 &nbsp; &quot;I would contribute to darcs if only...&quot;<br>
</blockquote><div><br>I haven&#39;t used darcs much, so it&#39;s possible that I&#39;ll be forced to start contributing by my own binding hypothetical.<br><br>I would contribute to darcs if only it had support / could have support for splitting and merging repositories.&nbsp; For example, I like to work in a big repository of all my stuff ever, because most of the things I do rarely exceed an experiment in one file.&nbsp; But once something does get big enough to be interesting, I want to split it off into its own repository.&nbsp; But that&#39;s just the use case: doing it the git way (go through all patches, discard irrelevant ones, filter relevant ones, thus losing all correlation with the original repository) is not going to inspire me; I&#39;d like to see support for it in the beautiful patch theory.<br>
<br>Luke<br>&nbsp;<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br>
The answers I am most interested in hearing go beyond &quot;... I had more<br>
time&quot;. &nbsp;For instance, if you are contributing to other Haskell/volunteer<br>
projects, why are you contributing more to them, rather than darcs?<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
The context:<br>
<br>
Lately, darcs has suffered a setback: the GHC team has decided that it<br>
is now time to switch to a different system, like git or Mercurial.<br>
This is probably a good thing for GHC and for us. &nbsp;By the way, good<br>
luck to them, and thanks for everything! (better GHC == better darcs)<br>
<br>
But where is darcs going? &nbsp;For now, we are going to have to focus on<br>
what we do best, providing precision merging and a consistent user<br>
interface for small-to-medium sized projects. &nbsp;I want more, though! &nbsp;I<br>
want to see darcs 2.1 come out next year, performance enhanced out the<br>
wazoo, and running great on Windows. &nbsp;And I want to see Future Darcs,<br>
the universal revision control system, seamlessly integrating with<br>
everybody else.<br>
<br>
We need to learn to do better so that darcs can achieve this kind of<br>
wild success. &nbsp;For example, whereas darcs suffers from the &quot;day job&quot;<br>
problem, xmonad has had to turn developers away!<br>
<br>
As Don mentions, this is partly thanks to their extreme accessibility<br>
(better self-documentation). &nbsp;But does anyone have more specific ideas<br>
about things we need to change so that you can contribute to darcs?<br>
How do we hit critical hacker mass?<br>
<br>
I have jotted down some other thoughts here regarding recruitment here:<br>
 &nbsp;<a href="http://wiki.darcs.net/index.html/Recruitment" target="_blank">http://wiki.darcs.net/index.html/Recruitment</a><br>
<br>
In the meantime, if you have been discouraged from hacking on darcs,<br>
we want to know why, and how we can change things!<br>
<br>
Thanks,<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>