<div dir="ltr"><br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 22, 2008 at 1:50 PM, Daniel Fischer <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:daniel.is.fischer@web.de">daniel.is.fischer@web.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" class="gmail_quote">Am Montag, 22. September 2008 08:32 schrieb Andrew Coppin:<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d">&gt; &gt; However, I will grant you that Map k v, could have used longer type<br>&gt; &gt; variables. But we are not alone with using one letter type variable<br>&gt; &gt; names <a target="_blank" href="http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/HashMap.html">http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/HashMap.html</a> . And<br>
&gt; &gt; frankly, in this specific case, I think most programmers (Haskell or<br>&gt; &gt; non-Haskell) will be able to guess what k and v means, when they are<br>&gt; &gt; standing right after Map.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; Only if you can figure out that &quot;Map&quot; means what every other programming<br>
&gt; language on the face of the Earth calls a &quot;dictionary&quot;. (This took me a<br>&gt; while!)<br><br></div>So, when did Java leave the face of the earth?</blockquote>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>At the same time as C++ presumably. I hadn&#39;t really noticed, but I&#39;ll be the first to say: Good riddance!</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div></div><br>-- <br>Sebastian Sylvan<br>+44(0)7857-300802<br>UIN: 44640862<br></div>