Thank you, guys, i somehow got the impression that there has to be some meaning to this. It seemed unprobable, but why would anybody write it like that if there weren&#39;t some reason to it ? ;-)))<br><br>Have a nice holidays, btw.<br>
<br>&nbsp; Cheers, wman.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Dec 23, 2008 at 3:21 PM, Duncan Coutts <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:duncan.coutts@worc.ox.ac.uk">duncan.coutts@worc.ox.ac.uk</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c">On Tue, 2008-12-23 at 05:21 +0100, wman wrote:<br>
&gt; I encountered the following code :<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; -- B == Data.ByteString ; L == Data.ByteString.Lazy<br>
&gt; contents&#39; = B.intercalate B.empty $ L.toChunks contents<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; with a previously unencountered function intercalate. A quick google<br>
&gt; query later i knew that it&#39;s just intersperse &amp; concat nicely bundled<br>
&gt; and started wondering why anybody would do this, as simple<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; contents&#39; = B.concat $ L.toChunks contents<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; would do (probably nearly) the same. The only thing I am able to come<br>
&gt; up with is that it somehow helps streamline the memory usage (if it<br>
&gt; has some meaning).<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Is there some reason to use intercalate &lt;empty&gt; &lt;list&gt; instead of<br>
&gt; concat &lt;list&gt; (probably when dealing with non-lazy bytestrings) ?<br>
<br>
</div></div>I cannot see any advantage. I would be extremely surprised if the more<br>
obscure version was faster.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
Duncan<br>
<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br>