<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 2:52 AM, Cristiano Paris <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:frodo@theshire.org">frodo@theshire.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
On Tue, Dec 30, 2008 at 8:35 AM, Conal Elliott &lt;<a href="mailto:conal@conal.net">conal@conal.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; Everything in Haskell is a function [...]<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Where did this idea come from?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; I&#39;d say every expression in Haskell denotes a pure value, only some of which<br>
&gt; are functions (have type a-&gt;b for some types a &amp; b).<br>
<br>
Maybe more formally correct, but my statement still holds true as any<br>
values can be tought as constant functions, even those representing<br>
functions themselves.<br>
<br>
Cristiano</blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think most of the introductory material I&#39;ve seen that made me go &quot;aha now I get it&quot; say pure functional programming is about values, and transformations of those values, and that functions are also values. &nbsp;Then they usually go into admitting that that&#39;s only really good for heating up the CPU and that I/O and side-effects have to be made possible, but they&#39;re not willing to give up what they won for us by having everything be a value... then monads enter the discussion or &quot;actions&quot;, and then monads get introduced later.</div>
<div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Dave</div><div>&nbsp;</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>