<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">I'd almost say that there is no such thing as partial application in<br>
Haskell. Since every:<br>
<br>
&gt; f  a  b  c<br>
<br>
is really:<br>
<br>
&gt; f  a  (b  c)<br>
<br>
there are no multiple arguments to be applied 'partially', only a<br>
function 'f' that takes one argument and gives you another, anonymous,<br>
function.<br></blockquote><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div>Mmm. And since tuples are just one syntactic sugared kind of ADTs, maybe Haskell doesn&#39;t have real currying either? ;-) Because really any kind of ADT could be curried in a sense no? Unless we really think of tuples as a handy anonymous kind of ADT that gets special treatment, e.g. because it is the only way to return multiple values from a function in Haskell (without having to declare a new type as must be done in C#, C++ etc?) Which is probably the case...</div>
<div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">&nbsp;</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">
&nbsp;<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div>