I think the capabilities community including E and Coyotos/BitC have extensively addressed this topic. Coyotos is taking the correct approach for trusted voting platform. Since, even if your software is trustworthy, it can&#39;t be trusted if the OS on which it runs is suspect. However, we might have a few more rigged elections before we see any deliverables from Coyotos.<br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Feb 19, 2009 at 2:45 AM, Ketil Malde <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ketil@malde.org">ketil@malde.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">Rick R &lt;<a href="mailto:rick.richardson@gmail.com">rick.richardson@gmail.com</a>&gt; writes:<br>
<br>
&gt; I&#39;m sure Premier Election Solutions (formerly Diebold) can provide us with<br>
&gt; an online voting solution.<br>
<br>
</div>You know, while the recent voting scandals have been milked for all<br>
they&#39;re worth by the open source community, FP has been very quiet<br>
about it. &nbsp;Isn&#39;t this an application where correctness matters? &nbsp;How<br>
about a proof that the software never loses (or injects) votes, for<br>
instance?<br>
<br>
-k<br>
<font color="#888888">--<br>
If I haven&#39;t seen further, it is by standing in the footprints of giants<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>We can&#39;t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them. <br> &nbsp; &nbsp;- A. Einstein<br>