<br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Mar 8, 2009 at 11:19 PM, Ashley Yakeley <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ashley@semantic.org">ashley@semantic.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">Eelco Lempsink wrote:<br><br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">The list with options can be found here (for now): <a href="http://community.haskell.org/~eelco/poll.html" target="_blank">http://community.haskell.org/~eelco/poll.html</a>  Notice that some (very) similar logos are grouped as one option (thanks to Ian Lynagh) All submissions compete, so that still makes more than a 100 options!<br>
<br>The voting system we&#39;ll use is the Condorcet Internet Voting System (<a href="http://www.cs.cornell.edu/andru/civs.html" target="_blank">http://www.cs.cornell.edu/andru/civs.html</a>).<br></blockquote><br>So ranking all 100+ items on the Condorcet ballot is a bit of a daunting task. However, if we get a rough idea of the favourites, we can each cut down a bit on the work.<br>
<br>For instance, suppose 82 and 93 are very popular. You might not like either of them, but it&#39;s worth ranking them on your ballot (after the ones you do like) if you have a preference between them. But there&#39;s less need to rank the ones no-one likes.</blockquote>

<div> </div>
<div>I&#39;m pretty sure this is precisely how the system works. You bring the ones you care about to the top and rank them, and everything else shares a rank at the bottom (or you could pick a few of those that you really dislike and put them even lower than the default rank). But the point is that you shouldn&#39;t need to rank every single logo, just the ones you care about and then you leave the rest at the default rank.</div>
</div><br>-- <br>Sebastian Sylvan<br>+44(0)7857-300802<br>UIN: 44640862<br>