<div dir="ltr"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2009/4/3 Duane Johnson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:duane.johnson@gmail.com">duane.johnson@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div style="">Perhaps it wouldn&#39;t be as all-wonderful as I think, but as a &quot;new&quot; Haskell user, I am constantly switching back and forth between various definitions of things trying to compare documentation and files...<div>
<br></div><div>The purpose of &quot;expansion&quot; as I was explaining it is not to *permanently replace* what is in the text, but rather to *temporarily replace* it.  I imagine it kind of like a &quot;zoom in&quot; for code.  You could &quot;zoom in&quot; on one function, and seeing a new function that you don&#39;t recognize, &quot;zoom in&quot; again, and so on.  Once done, you would hit &quot;ESC&quot; to make it all return as it was.</div>
</div></blockquote><div><br>Sounds exactly like the F9 feature in Excel (that&#39;s where you got the idea, right?). I can personally attest that it can be an incredibly useful feature.<br><br>Michael <br></div></div><br>
</div>