<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Jun 1, 2009 at 3:06 AM, Sebastian Fischer <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:sebf@informatik.uni-kiel.de">sebf@informatik.uni-kiel.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Jun 1, 2009, at 12:17 AM, Henning Thielemann wrote:<br>
<br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">
On Thu, 28 May 2009, Bulat Ziganshin wrote:<br>
<br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">
i use another approach which imho is somewhat closer to interpretation<br></div>
of logical operations in dynamic languages (lua, ruby, perl): [...]<br>
</blockquote><div class="im">
<br>
The absence of such interpretations and thus the increased type safety was one of the major the reasons for me to move from scripting languages to Haskell.<br>
</div></blockquote>
<br>
Do you argue that overloading logical operations like this in Haskell sacrifices type safety? Could programs &quot;go wrong&quot; [1] that use such abstractions?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>If I understand your point correctly, you are suggesting that such programs are still type safe.  I agree with the claim that such features are detrimental in practice though.  Instead of lumping it with type safety, then what do we call it?  I think I&#39;ve heard of languages that do such conversions as &quot;weakly&quot; typed.  Really the issue is with implicit conversions, right?</div>
<div><br></div><div>Jason</div></div>