I think it would be best if the page were  targeted towards newcomers, and not as a jump point for resources. <br>Such a jump page is useful, but not as a homepage. Perhaps <a href="http://haskell.org/links">haskell.org/links</a> would be a better place for such a thing. <br>
<br>As an aside, in the current homepage, the Haskell description is outweighed by the link menu on the left. IMO the reader&#39;s eyes should move from the title, to the description, then either down or left.  Currently my attention is split evenly between the link menu and the title/description, which results in confusion. <br>
<br><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jul 9, 2009 at 12:33 PM, Don Stewart <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:dons@galois.com">dons@galois.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
ttencate:<br>
<div class="im">&gt; Are there any kind of hard statistics and analytics that we can base<br>
&gt; this discussion upon? There is always room for improvement, but<br>
&gt; stumbling around in the dark making blind guesses may not be the best<br>
&gt; way to go. Although I personally feel that Lenny&#39;s proposed page is an<br>
&gt; improvement, statistics could tell us what actual people actually use<br>
&gt; the site for.<br>
<br>
</div>FWIW, the current layout is actually based on previous analysis of Popular<br>
Pages a few years ago, so that we have O(1) access to key resources.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
-- Don<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>&quot;The greatest obstacle to discovering the shape of the earth, the continents, and the oceans was not ignorance but the illusion of knowledge.&quot; <br>- Daniel J. Boorstin<br>
<br>