<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: -webkit-sans-serif; line-height: 19px; "><div>After my colleague explained me about zippers and how one could derive the datatype using differential rules, I had to read about it.</div>
<div><br></div><div>So I started reading <a href="http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Zippers#Mechanical_Differentiation">http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Zippers#Mechanical_Differentiation</a></div><div><br></div><div>
This page contains the sentence:  <i>&quot;For a systematic construction, we need to calculate with types. The basics of structural calculations with types are outlined in a separate chapter </i><a href="http://en.wikibooks.org/w/index.php?title=Haskell/Generic_Programming&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="Haskell/Generic Programming (does not exist)" style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(165, 88, 88); background-image: none; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; -webkit-background-clip: initial; -webkit-background-origin: initial; background-color: initial; background-position: initial initial; "><i>Generic Programming</i></a><i> and <b>we will heavily rely on this material</b>&quot;</i></div>
<div><i><br></i></div><div>However, the generic programming link does not exist yet :-)  </div><div><br></div><div>So although I now have a rough idea about it, I don&#39;t understand the details yet, e.g. notation like</div>
<div><br></div><div><img class="tex" alt="\mathit{Node}\,A = \mu X.\,\mathit{NodeF}_A\,X" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/9/b/e/9bed050a00ec20ff8a617152b4934d74.png" style="border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: middle; "></div>
<div><br></div><div>doesn&#39;t make much sense to me yet, although I suspect I can read the mu as a lambda on types?</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks,</div><div>Peter</div><div><i><br></i></div></span>