<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Sep 29, 2009 at 5:24 PM, Casey Hawthorne <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:caseyh@istar.ca">caseyh@istar.ca</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
I read somewhere that for 90% of a wide class of computing problems,<br>
you only need 10% of the source code in Haskell, that you would in an<br>
imperative language.<br>
<br>
If this is true, it needs to be pushed.<br>
<br>
And if by changing a few lines of source code one can develop a whole<br>
family of similar applications, that needs to be pushed, also.<br></blockquote><div><br>If you look through the archives here and elsewhere on the net, I think you&#39;ll see that technical superiority isn&#39;t the driving force for language adoption.  It can help, but other factors seem to play a more significant role, usually dependent on context in which the languages became popular.  At times it can seem like luck, but then I&#39;m reminded of what Louis Pasteur said about luck and prepared minds.<br>
<br>It is good that you&#39;re talking about Haskell though.  Continue to discuss it with your peers and show them fun and cool things you&#39;ve written using Haskell.  I think this is more compelling for the uninitiated than statements about perceived technical power of the language.  I&#39;ve heard people explain this as, &quot;showing is better than telling.&quot;<br>
<br>Cheers,<br>Jason<br></div></div>