<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Oct 1, 2009 at 9:53 AM, Andrew Coppin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:andrewcoppin@btinternet.com">andrewcoppin@btinternet.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">Sure. But what is a computer program? It&#39;s a *list of instructions* that tells a computer *how to do something*. And yet, the Haskell definition of sum looks more like a definition of what a sum is rather than an actual, usable procedure for *computing* that sum. (Of course, we know that it /is/ in fact executable... it just doesn&#39;t look it at first sight.)</div>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Is it? The list of instruction is just an abstraction layer built on top of purely physical process of electrons and transistors; I&#39;m not sure how much imperativeness remains at this level? Not to mention the quantum mechanical processes that take place... And that are also just mathematical models... I mean, it really depends from which angle and at which detail you look at it, no?</div>
<div><br></div></div>