<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;"><br><blockquote style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"><div class="plainMail"><br>However, Ocaml's strict evaluation makes it easy for someone new to<br>the language to have a pretty accurate guess about its run time and <br>memory usage something which can be difficult in the face of Haskell's<br>lazy evaluation (not that I have experienced any obvious manifestations<br>of this myself).<br><br>Erik<br><br></div></blockquote>Speaking as "someone new to the language", this is one subject that confused me while reading RWH. They kept using the phrase "space leak" and I would think "Well, I understand that with laziness one simple call could trigger an explosion of calculations but how is that a 'leak'?"<br><br>I had to go back and reread that section before I realized that the laziness was implemented as *runtime
 thunks* and I finally understood why they called it a "leak". Looking back I think they did a good job explaining it after all, I just totally missed it the first time through. <br><div class="plainMail"><br></div></td></tr></table><br>