<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Dec 7, 2009 at 4:37 PM, Andrew Coppin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:andrewcoppin@btinternet.com">andrewcoppin@btinternet.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im"><br></div>
And I have no problem with needing to install a Haskell compiler. If I had to install a seperate C compiler to make FFI to C work, that wouldn&#39;t seem unreasonable either. (As it happens, GHC has a C backend, so the C compiler just happens to be there already.) What does seem very weird is having to turn my Windows box into a psuedo-Unix system in order to write native Windows programs.<div class="im">
<br>
&lt;snip&gt;</div><div class="im"><br></div>
You can&#39;t develop anything with just what&#39;s preinstalled. (Well, unless you could writing batch scripts...)<br>
<br>
Generally, if you want to develop C or C++ applications on Windows, you install MS Visual Studio. It gives you the compiler, linker, dependency management, and a whole bunch of other stuff. You typically wouldn&#39;t install gcc, ld and Automake. (Unless of course you were specifically trying to port existing Unix code, obviously.)<br>

<br></blockquote></div>It helps, I believe, if you stop thinking of MinGW with MSYS as &#39;a pseudo-Unix system&#39;.  They&#39;re billed as the minimal toolset required on windows to use the GNU compilers and build system (and, as everybody knows, Gnu&#39;s not Unix).  The great thing about these compilers is that they&#39;re cross-platform and freely available, unlike MS Visual Studio.  I think that it makes sense that open source software developers targeting multiple platforms would want to pick a tool suite that works across all those platforms, and the GNU tools fit that description.  Cygwin truly is a Unix emulation, but MinGW/MSYS is just a packaging of useful open source (GNU) tools for Windows (including a shell).  Many programs that work well as native Windows apps, such as the GIMP, are built with them.<br>
<br>