<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 12:04 AM, Jon Harrop <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jon@ffconsultancy.com">jon@ffconsultancy.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div><div></div><div class="h5">
<br>
</div></div>Forcing the evaluating of a thunk replaces the unevaluated expression with the<br>
value it evaluates to. That is effectively in-place mutation.<br></blockquote></div><br>How can one use that to gain on efficiency? I understand that laziness allows a modified data structure to share nodes with the original data structure preventing unnecessary copying, but I do not see how forcing an evaluation can be used to gain on efficiency (or alternatively prevent inefficiency). Is there any simple example to illustrate this (or should I read Okasaki)?<br clear="all">
<br>-- <br>Thanks,<br>Gautam<br>