<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On 13 Jan 2010, at 09:51, Peter Verswyvelen wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Nov 1, 2009 at 2:57 AM, Gregory Collins <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:greg@gregorycollins.net">greg@gregorycollins.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">Doing OO-style programming in Haskell is difficult and unnatural, it's</div>
true (although technically speaking it is possible). That said, nobody's<br>
yet to present a convincing argument to me why Java gets a free pass for<br>
lacking closures and typeclasses.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I might be wrong, but doesn't Java's concepts of inner classes and interfaces together with adapter classes can be used to replace closures and typeclasses in a way?</div></div></blockquote><br></div><div>Inner classes are not a semantic replacement for closures, even if you discount horrific syntax. Inner classes do not close over their lexical environment.</div><div><br></div><div>Martin</div></body></html>