I call it &quot;an m&quot; or (more specifically) &quot;an Int m&quot; or &quot;a list of Int&quot;.  For instance, &quot;a list&quot; or &quot;an Int list&quot; or &quot;a list of Int&quot;.  - Conal<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">

On Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 12:14 PM, Luke Palmer <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:lrpalmer@gmail.com">lrpalmer@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">

<div class="im">On Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 11:39 AM, Jochem Berndsen &lt;<a href="mailto:jochem@functor.nl">jochem@functor.nl</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; Now, here&#39;s the question: Is is correct to say that [3, 5, 8] is a<br>
&gt;&gt; monad?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; In what sense would this be a monad? I don&#39;t quite get your question.<br>
<br>
</div>I think the question is this:  if m is a monad, then what do you call<br>
a thing of type m Int, or m Whatever.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
Luke<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>